SSC Home Page
Spitzer Science Center
 SSC Home -  Active Mission -  Overview -  IRAC -  IRS -  MIPS -  Data Archive -  Data Analysis & Tools
RSS Feed
Knowledgebase : Observation Planning
Yes and no. You can't propose to observe exactly the same target with exactly the same mode (same total integration time), UNLESS the target itself is likely to have changed between observations (which can indeed be the case for variable objects). For all...
Yes. The Observatory is capable of tracking Solar System targets up to a rate of 1 arcsec per second. A special section within the online Proposal Kit is devoted to planning Solar System observations.
Cluster targets are a TARGET definition, not an AOT definition. First, create the target in Spot, then create the AOT for that target. _Be careful_ when using map center offset or cluster array coordinate offsets for an asymmetric pattern about the map...
The downloadable Spot software is an essential ingredient in planning any observation with Spitzer. It calculates execution times, creates Astronomical Observing Requests (AORs), and offers access to various sky visibility and astronomical planning tools....
Sorry, but there is no elegant way to search our archive just by object type. (I suspect that such a search would not be terribly practical in the following sense: any such search will turn up hits in pretty much all of the large surveys, at the very leas...
At any time, you can use Leopard [1] to search the ROC, and/or you can use Spot [2] to download entire programs. You might also be interested in exactly what constitutes a duplicate observation [3], because the observation you are planning may not actuall...
The Spitzer Reserved Observations Catalog (ROC) is technically no longer a static ASCII list. It is the set of all executed or planned observations in our database. The ROC should be searched via Leopard. In general the SSC will not allow a duplication of...
An example of the problem using the SH and LH slits is illustrated here: http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/files/spitzer/n1365_irs_sh_lh.jpg [1]. The spectral map positions are in array coordinates, which have axes that are parallel and perpendicular to t...
Do you have a really good reason for wanting this? We prefer to have chains less then 8 hours for normal science observations, but make exceptions in the case of high precision IRAC photometry (eg. for exoplanet light curves) You can create chains long...
DO YOU HAVE A REALLY GOOD REASON FOR WANTING TO DO THIS? We do allow observations longer then 24 hours if scientifically justified, but we really do prefer shorter observations in order to do spacecraft calibrations on a routine schedule. The maximum du...
For new moving targets that are not in the name resolving file for Spot (ephemeris_pairs.prop), Spot complains that the target has no name associated with it. However, you can still get visibility windows and AIRE estimates. You just have to click ok on t...
If you really want to observe this target, you should say exactly this in your proposal, that your proposed observation may or may not be a duplication, depending on exactly when the other observation is scheduled. We will inform the science panels and TA...
The main tool you will need to plan your observation is: Spot [http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/warmmission/propkit/spot/]. Spot is packaged with Leopard; together, this is Spitzer Pride. Spot is used for planning observations. You can search the database o...
Questions should be submitted to the Spitzer HelpDesk at help@spitzer.caltech.edu. Your question will be forwarded to the proper SSC Office and an answer will generally be forthcoming within two days. Questions judged by the SSC to be of wide interest may...
Spitzer research proposals are, in general, submitted in response to a Call for Proposals issued by the SSC. The Spitzer science schedule indicates when future solicitations can be anticipated. The online Proposal Kit is a one-stop shopping mall for all o...
No, it is the potential observer's responsibility to make estimates of the source flux at the wavelengths of interest and to use the sensitivity and saturation information provided on the SSC web pages to determine if the target will be detected and its s...
Spot has an option to tell you if you are looking at or near a target that is too bright or already in the ROC. But this DOES NOT HAPPEN AUTOMATICALLY; you must choose to overlay 'bright objects' from the overlay menu, or the 'search programs' from the fi...